Highlights from PICCC’s recently completed projects

Highlights from PICCC’s recently completed projects

The PICCC partnership entered its fourth year in 2014-15, with a number of significant achievements. The past 12 months has seen the culmination of many of PICCC’s key collaborative research efforts, with work funded through the national methane, modelling, nitrous oxide and soil carbon programs now completed.

Some highlights from PICCC’s completed projects include:

  • Enhanced capacity within regional natural resource management organisations to make better use of climate change adaptation research, via the provision of new resources and information sharing processes.
  • Enteric methane research showing the efficacy of wheat, fat and oil supplementation for reducing livestock emissions.
  • The significant improvements in enteric methane measurement methodologies, particularly the sulphur hexafluoride technique which is now recognised as an invaluable tool for livestock emissions research.
  • The completion of over 30 whole farm systems analyses, quantifying the impact of various management strategies on farm emissions, productivity and profitability and demonstrating that although many strategies can reduce emissions, very few are profitable under current carbon policies.
  • The development of evidence for policy makers that mitigation strategies focused on emissions intensity and profitability (instead of net emissions) are the most effective way to reduce farm greenhouse gas emissions and improve farm efficiency and profitability.
  • The testing of nitrification inhibitors on dairy and cropping farms, which has contributed to improvements in national inventory emission factors, and will demonstrate for the first time their feasibility under commercial production conditions and in emissions reduction methodologies.
  • Conclusive evidence for farmers in high rainfall zones that maximising nitrogen fertiliser efficiency and delaying the timing of pasture termination prior to planting winter crops will minimise nitrous oxide emissions.
  • Verification, via modelling and field trials, that without proven productivity benefits or changes to the current price and policy environment, inhibitor-amended fertilisers and other nitrification inhibitor products are financially unviable for most Australian production systems, including dairy and vegetables..
  • Soil carbon research showing that crop rotations with legumes, zero tillage and stubble retention all have potential to increase soil carbon, but that only the conversion from cropping to pasture will consistently increase soil carbon.

Read more about PICCC's research results and outcomes in the PICCC Annual Report.